Moving to Newfoundland & Living There: A Comprehensive Guide

If you’re thinking of moving to Newfoundland and living there, you’ll want to read this comprehensive guide first! In it, we’ll cover everything from the cost of living to the local culture. We’ll also discuss transportation options and the availability of jobs in the province. And if that’s not enough, we’ll take a look at some of Newfoundland and Labrador’s emerging industries! So whether you’re just curious about living in Newfoundland or are seriously considering making a move, this guide has you covered.

Reasons to Move to Newfoundland and Labrador 

There are several reasons why living in Newfoundland and Labrador would be a sound decision. Those are:

  1. One significant advantage is the availability of jobs. According to the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador website, “Employment opportunities are available in almost every sector with some of the highest-paying jobs in Canada.”
  2. There are also affordable living options, with average housing cheaper than most major Canadian cities. The cost of living is much more reasonable than most Canadian cities, and the province has a high quality of life. 
  3. The province also has a very low crime rate, one of the lowest in Canada! This means living in Newfoundland and living there is safer than living in some other parts of Canada.
  4. Plus, it’s close to the ocean! So if you enjoy spending time near the water, living in Newfoundland and Labrador would be a great choice.
  5. Another factor that makes Newfoundland and Labrador seem like a step forward is accessibility to nature trails with miles-long boardwalks leading into the woods around townships like Riverdale–which makes a living there feel like living out your deepest childhood dream (that you didn’t even know you had). 
  6. The standard of education in Newfoundland and Labrador is excellent, with several prestigious institutions, including the Memorial University of Newfoundland and Marine Institute.
  7. The Newfoundland and Labrador community is very close-knit and welcoming, so living there as an expat would be easy.
  8. Newfoundland and Labrador food is also delicious, and living there means you’ll get to eat it all the time! Some of the most popular dishes include fish and chips, moose burgers, cod tongues (yes, really!), and Jiggs dinner.

So, as you can see, there are many reasons to consider living in Newfoundland and living there would be a great choice if you want an exciting and affordable place to live. Ready to move? Keep reading!

Moving to Newfoundland _ Living There A Comprehensive Guide

Living in Newfoundland and Labrador

Living in Newfoundland and Labrador is a unique experience. The province has its own dialect of English, and the locals are known for their friendliness and welcoming attitude. 

The cost of living is much cheaper than in most major Canadian cities, and there are many opportunities to enjoy the province’s rich culture. So whether you’re looking for an affordable place to live or want to experience living in a close-knit community, Newfoundland and Labrador are a great choice!

The province is also home to the oldest living culture in North America, the Beothuk. There are many opportunities to learn about and experience this culture first-hand if you move to Newfoundland and Labrador.

The local culture is unique and makes living in Newfoundland and Labrador a memorable experience. For example, the province has its dialect of English with specific words and phrases, like “b’y” (meaning boy) and “come from away” (a term used to describe people who are not from Newfoundland or Labrador). 

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Newfoundland and Labrador are well-known for their music and folk art, like the tin whistle and quilting.

Cost of living in Newfoundland and Labrador

If you’re considering moving to Newfoundland and living there, it’s essential to know the cost of living. The average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Newfoundland and Labrador is $600, much cheaper than the average rent in most major Canadian cities. 

The cost of living in the province is also much cheaper than in other parts of Canada. Food prices are also relatively low, with the average grocery bill coming to around $75 per week. 

The Cost of Dining and Food Culture

Dining in Newfoundland is also much cheaper than most other parts of Canada. For example, a meal at a local restaurant will usually cost around $15, and you can buy a carton of eggs for less than $0.70. 

One thing to note is that food in Newfoundland and Labrador is generally saltier than food in other parts of Canada, so living in Newfoundland and living there may take some getting used to if you’re not a fan of salt.

Another unique aspect of food culture is the local cuisine, including fish and chips, moose burgers, cod tongues, Jiggs dinner (a stew made with potatoes), and homemade bread with molasses. 

Cultural Activities & Events

The province of Newfoundland and Labrador is also well-known for its cultural activities, events and festivals. There are many opportunities to experience living in Newfoundland; living there as an expat would be easy!

Some of the most popular annual festivals include:

– The George Street Festival is held every summer in St. John’s (the capital city). The festival is a four-day celebration of music, food, and culture, with events happening all over the city.

– The Royal St. John’s Regatta is held every summer in St. John’s. This event is the world’s oldest continuous sporting event, dating back to 1816. It features races on boats called “skiffs.”

– The Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival is held every summer in St. John’s. It celebrates traditional music from the province, with performances by local musicians and international artists. 

Transportation

The province has all the transportation facilities. The airport is located in Gander and has regular flights to major Canadian cities like Toronto, Calgary, and Montreal. Some ferries connect the province with Nova Scotia and a network of roads that make it easy to get around. 

Availability of Jobs

The province is also home to a growing economy, with many opportunities for expats looking for jobs. The primary industries in Newfoundland and Labrador are oil and gas, fisheries, mining, and tourism. 

There are also many opportunities for those who want to start their own business. The provincial government offers several grants and tax incentives to help entrepreneurs get started living in Newfoundland living there.

The job market in Newfoundland and Labrador is diverse and includes opportunities in the tourism industry. 

Top In-demand Jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador 

The top 5 in-demand jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador are: 

1. Petroleum Engineer: 

This job involves designing and constructing oil rigs living in Newfoundland living there. The petroleum engineer is responsible for planning the drilling process and ensuring that the rigs are safe.

The average salary of a Petroleum Engineer in Newfoundland and Labrador is $68,708/yr

2. Civil Engineer:

The civil engineer is responsible for designing and constructing roads, bridges, highways, etc. The average salary of a Civil Engineer in Newfoundland and Labrador is $92,000 

3. Mining Engineer: 

The mining engineer is responsible for extracting and processing minerals from the earth. They also work with safety and environmental concerns. The average salary of a Mining Engineer in Newfoundland and Labrador is $85,000. 

4. Systems Analyst:

The systems analyst is responsible for designing and implementing computer systems. They also work with security and data management. The average salary of a Systems Analyst in Newfoundland and Labrador is $75,000 

5. Accountant: 

The accountant is responsible for preparing tax returns and financial statements. The average salary of an Accountant in Newfoundland and Labrador is $74,000

Checklist for Moving to Newfoundland and Labrador 

Overall, Newfoundland and Labrador are an excellent choice to move to Canada. However, before you take preparation, check these points.

  1. Make sure you’re comfortable living in a place with a slower pace of life. 
  2. Research the cost of living and make sure you can afford to live there 
  3. Research the job market and make sure there are opportunities available that match your skills 
  4. Make sure you enjoy seafood – the cuisine in Newfoundland is heavily based on seafood. 
  5. Learn about the local culture and make sure you’re open to trying new things 
  6. Make sure you’re comfortable living in a place with a strong accent – most people in Newfoundland and Labrador speak with a strong Newfoundland accent. 
  7. Be prepared for weather that is colder and windier than what you’re used to 

If you can check all these boxes, then Newfoundland and Labrador may be the perfect place for you!

Interesting Facts about Newfoundland for Immigrants

1. Newfoundland and Labrador are Canada’s most easterly provinces, having ceded independence to the British Empire in 1933 and becoming the tenth province to enter the Canadian Confederation in 1949.

2. The province’s economy is driven by its fisheries, mining (especially iron ore), and offshore oil rigs, providing significant job opportunities in these industries.

3. The Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP) and the Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP) offer immigration opportunities for skilled workers, international graduates, and immigrant entrepreneurs.

4. The NLPNP accepts applications under three immigration categories: Skilled Worker, International Graduate, and Immigrant Entrepreneur categories.

5. The AIP is an economic program for foreign nationals with approved employment offers in the Atlantic area, fulfilling specific education, work experience, and language competence standards.

6. Newfoundland and Labrador is home to two publicly-funded institutes of higher learning: Memorial University of Newfoundland and the College of the North Atlantic, offering a wide range of study programs and trade schools across the province.

Newfoundland and Labrador Cities

The main cities of Newfoundland and Labrador are :

  • St. John’s 
  • Corner Brook 
  • Grand Falls Windsor 
  • Gander 

Each of these cities has its unique character and offers different opportunities for those looking to move there. For example, if you’re interested in living in a smaller town with a slower pace of life, Corner Brook may be a good choice living in Newfoundland living there.

Moving to St. John’s 

St. John’s is known for its colorful row houses, lively music scene, and friendly locals. This vibrant city is the capital of Newfoundland and Labrador. It has a population of about 185 thousand people living in ​​about 44 square miles (110 km²).

Moving to Corner Brook 

Corner Brook is a smaller city with about 24 thousand people. It’s located on the west coast of Newfoundland and has an area of ​​about 12 square miles (30 km²). The town is known for its outdoor activities like skiing and hiking living in Newfoundland living there.

Moving to Grand Falls Windsor 

Grand Falls Windsor is a smaller city with about 18 thousand people living in an area of ​​about 11 square miles (27 km²). The town has many outdoor activities for those who want to get outside and enjoy nature living in Newfoundland living there.

Moving to Gander 

Gander is a town of about 11 thousand people located in the central part of Newfoundland. The airport in Gander is one of the largest airports in Canada, and it’s often used as a stopover for those traveling to Europe living in Newfoundland living there.

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Conclusion

If you’re considering moving to Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador are excellent choices. The province has a growing economy, with many opportunities for ex-pats in various industries. The job market is diverse, and the locals are friendly and welcoming. Before making a move, research the cost of living and the availability of jobs that match your skill set. Be prepared for weather colder than what you’re used to – but be assured that living in Newfoundland and Labrador comes with unique experiences!

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DISCLAIMER: Please note that the information provided on this website is for general understanding only and should not be considered as legal advice. Every pages of the website is not updated every day. It is recommended to consult with our lawyers for latest information.

1 thought on “Moving to Newfoundland & Living There: A Comprehensive Guide”

  1. The point that you made about the job market is incorrect. There is a major job shortage here (particularly in the science sector). I literally searched up positions online using the broad term “science,” and 20 jobs appeared across the entire postings board. More specifically, one of those positions was a Marketing Coordinator role at Bubba’s Tubs. In other words, this province believes that business jobs are science positions (which could not be further from the truth). Also, this province is not disability friendly due to its hard-core car-dependency compared to other places in Canada. As an epileptic, once I have a seizure, I have to use a Paratransit service that confines me to St. John’s and Mount Pearl, which is absolutely pathetic at best. I’m planning on moving to Ontario next year due to a lack of job opportunities, disability resources, sources of entertainment, and frankly just hating it here altogether. I will never recommend moving here in the slightest, and anyone who does this will be making a big mistake.

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